First, It’s Easy To Give Command and Prohibition

First, It's Easy To Give Command and Prohibition

We often hear fellow students in the classroom to give command or prohibition in our national language. The command or prohibition is usually a brief response and spontaneous when one of them is facing with a particular problem or situation. It is very easy to say, close the door, open the door, close the window, open the window, go, enter, read this, read that, write this and write that. It’s even easier to change the giving command and prohibition from our national language into English. Not only greetings or introductionself but also you can turn command and prohibition into a good habit in English class. Yes, let us learn how to give command and prohibition easily.

First, What is Command and Prohibition.

Command is a type of sentence expressed to order someone for doing something. If it is not shaped shoftener, command sentences are usually expressed strictly. They can start with imperative verbs. In English we just use the infinitive form of the verb without “to” and subject. On the other hand, prohibition is a type of sentence expressed to forbide someone for doing something. If it is not also shaped shoftener, prohibition sentences are usually expressed strictly too. Then how? Just use the infinitive form of the verb without “to” then speak or write it preceded by “Don’t”.

Second, How to Give Command and Examples.

Once again to give command is not difficult. Just think a verb without ‘to’ then speak or write it strictly. You can complete it with noun, pronoun or adverb. It is simple to practice if students of class keep commitment ‘to forget’ temporarily how to say it politely. This situation must be understood because the students are learning English as foreign language. So, just begin. One of the students can tell his problem in national language and other student can respond it in English command. For example, Ary, a student from Indonesia said, “Saya lapar” and Any responded, “Eat now!”. Let’s turn command expressions into habit and your English class will become fun and live, won’t it? Here are the examples of command expressions:

  • Sir down!
  • Listen!
  • Text the number!
  • Call the number!
  • Write This!
  • Take notes!
  • Eat now!
  • Drink coffee!
  • Cook now!
  • Wash it!
  • Brush your teeth!
  • Open the door!
  • Close the window!
  • Hands up!
  • Read your book!

Third, How to Give Prohibition and Examples.

To give prohibition is easy too. Just  think a verb without ‘to’ then speak or write it strictly then speak or write it preceded by Don’t. You can complete it with noun, pronoun or adverb too. It is as simple as command to practice. One of the students can tell his problem in national language and other student can respond it in English prohibition. For example, Ria, a student from Indonesia said, “Apa yang saya ceritakan ini penting” and Dony responded, “Don’t be noisy!”. That’s nice. Here are the examples of prohibition expressions:

  • Don’t be noisy!
  • Don’t pass here!
  • Don’t run!
  • Don’t park here!
  • Don’t waste water!
  • Don’t waste food!
  • Don’t touch!
  • Don’t smoke!
  • Don’t litter!
  • Don’t sit!
  • Don’t drink and drive!
  • Don’t play truant!
  • Don’t walk on the grass!

Fourth, How To Learn Command and Prohibition Politely.

The ideal one is polite command and prohibition in use. But, if  we emphasize  learning language into habit, agree or disagree we have to let command and prohibition are said by the students not politely. Please take a risk. Instead of they don’t take action because they have lack of knowledge  to give command or prohibition politely, it would be better to let them ‘shout’. This is a learning English process. When command and prohibition had been fluent  classroom interaction, it would be a right time to shape command and prohibition more polite and softener. On the next post, we will  write how to give command and prohibition more politely include the use of the use of modals, if conditional sentence, past progressive tense and a number of special qualifiers. Always get in touch

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *